credit card details

Bruce

Well-Known Member
#1
Today I phoned Jabiru with the number of my new credit card so they can send me bits and charge them to that card. They have been completely trustworthy in the past.
Now they did not ask for the security number. ( nor the pin number of course) .
Another place I have dealt with wanted the security number and I felt uncomfortable giving it to them.
Does anybody know why the difference?
As a suspicious old bugger, the card I use is a debit card with only a bit of money in it. Am I being too cautious here?
 

Old Koreelah

Well-Known Member
#2
Interesting question, Bruce. I've been asked for the 3-digit security number for some small online purchases, but some larger ones didn't require it. Beats me.
 

octave

Well-Known Member
#3
Today I phoned Jabiru with the number of my new credit card so they can send me bits and charge them to that card. They have been completely trustworthy in the past.
Now they did not ask for the security number. ( nor the pin number of course) .
Another place I have dealt with wanted the security number and I felt uncomfortable giving it to them.
Does anybody know why the difference?
As a suspicious old bugger, the card I use is a debit card with only a bit of money in it. Am I being too cautious here?

do you mean the three-digit CCV code on the back of the card?

What is a credit card CCV / CVC number? | finder.com.au
 
#4
Hmm.. Let me see...

Company rep: "The long card number please?"

You: 4563 3493 3234 3393

Them: "Thank you,; expiry date, please"

You: 01/22

Them: "Thank you; your postcode please*:?"

You: 6123

Them: Thank you, the last three digits on the back of the card please?

You: 123

How on god's earth does that CVC code make it more secure? If the fella at the other end of the line is jotting it all down.. thereis no way that three digit number is going to make it harder. I assume for the other 4 digit number, it would be a similar exchange, so it would be no safer. The security standards for cards is appalling - I demonstrated to a card issuer just how easy it was (in the UK) to steal from cards using this method.

Best advice (depending on the law in Aus, which I am led to believe is far more weighted to the consumer than the banks then here, despite he Royal Commission) is to use a credit card, or in the absence of a CC, use a debit card with no overdrraft and only keep a couple of hundred smackeroos in it until you expect a pig payment to be drawn down.

* UK postcodes are far more granular than Aussie ones - using a postcoode downunder would be not terribly great, uinless it is a station in outback WA.
 

red750

Well-Known Member
#5
In Aus, the postcode is not used, but you must quote the name on the card exactly, as in ANGUS T JONES. The CVC cannot be picked up by card skimmers.
 
#6
So, when you quote a CVC code to the person at the end of the phone, as well as all the other identifying info - what is to stop them from noting it and taking licence?
 

octave

Well-Known Member
#7
So, when you quote a CVC code to the person at the end of the phone, as well as all the other identifying info - what is to stop them from noting it and taking licence?
Whilst by itself the number probably adds little to the security of the card as Red points out it makes electronic skimming of the card difficult. Whether the seller requires to ask for the code is not up to the seller but is required by the card issuer for some sellers. Presumably, they believe it has some benefits for them. It is worth remembering that it is the card issuer that bears the risk of fraudulent activity on your card.

By the way for anyone interested, here is some interesting info Card security code - Wikipedia
 
#9
Agree - CVC can't be picked up by card skimmers per se (though ther was a case where an employee of a small shop would drop the card on the floor, skim it and remember then jot down the CVC); I was more referring to @Bruce's telephone situation at Jabiru...

Laws in Aus are more prefereable to the card holder than the card issuer here... Also, the route to recovery is probably less tortuous..
 

Bruce

Well-Known Member
#10
Thanks guys. I have experienced card fraud even with the debit-only one I use for online transactions.
Apparently the cost of card fraud (to the banks, who footed the bill at least in my case ) is less than the extra profits they make by having lax policies.
It is surprising that Australia has better credit card laws than the UK.
 
#11
On credit cards, if you don't receive the goods yuo don't have to pay the credit card bill - that is OK - except try and get the money back - it is no simple process such as the small claims tribunal (in Vic, anyway). The rout to the county court is tortuous, they can have QCs represent them, introduce delays and it can cost more than the recovery is worth - and you don't get the loser to foot your bill... (don't ask how I know)

Debit card law here is that they are not liable until you report the card stolen - so in theory - a skim or something like that leaves the card holder carrying the can. This happened in the earlier days, though it is solely at the banks discretion whether or not they refund - they often do nowadays for reputation reasons).
 
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