Do NASA's observations rebut the Greens rhetoric?

old man emu

Well-Known Member
#81
We are looking at the introduction of European diseases to Aboriginals as though it was a deliberate case of biological warfare. It wasn't. Don't forget that those early European immigrants had as much knowledge of the microbial causes of disease as did the Aborigines. I'm sure that if we were time-traveled back to Sydney Cove in 1819, we'd be retching within a few minutes as we mixed with the Great Unwashed. It wasn't until the work of Pasteur in the 1850's that the germ theory of disease took over from the ancient miasma theory that disease was caused by "bad air" arising from rotting material. Vaccination for Small Pox was carried out in England from around the time of the First Fleet, but it is unlikely that the Lower Classes would have had access to it, or were convinced of its value.

The Aborigines had their own pharmacopoeia using naturally occurring plant-based chemicals. 40,000+ years of isolation didn't let them experience diseases like tuberculosis, Small Pox (and other minor poxes) and the STDs. It wasn't until 1980 that Small Pox was said to have been eradicated, but I bet it still lurks somewhere. In Australia we had a program to eradicate tuberculosis. There are around 1200 to 1300 cases of tuberculosis each year, which means we are among the lowest-risk countries in the world. People who were born and grew up in Australia are very unlikely to get TB, unless they have close contact with a sick person. The low humidity and heat of our climate help kill off the TB germ in the environment. The people most at risk of TB in Australia are those who have spent their early years of life in countries with high rates of the disease. The arrival of immigrants from those countries is the reason we can't eradicate the disease here.
 

pmccarthy

Well-Known Member
#82
We have a giant snake near us that is made of granite stones and runs over a hill. It is about 300m long and has a head of stone. Researchers here believe it was built to appease a god at the time of smallpox around 1820-30.
 

coljones

Well-Known Member
#83
We are looking at the introduction of European diseases to Aboriginals as though it was a deliberate case of biological warfare. It wasn't. Don't forget that those early European immigrants had as much knowledge of the microbial causes of disease as did the Aborigines. I'm sure that if we were time-traveled back to Sydney Cove in 1819, we'd be retching within a few minutes as we mixed with the Great Unwashed. It wasn't until the work of Pasteur in the 1850's that the germ theory of disease took over from the ancient miasma theory that disease was caused by "bad air" arising from rotting material. Vaccination for Small Pox was carried out in England from around the time of the First Fleet, but it is unlikely that the Lower Classes would have had access to it, or were convinced of its value.

The Aborigines had their own pharmacopoeia using naturally occurring plant-based chemicals. 40,000+ years of isolation didn't let them experience diseases like tuberculosis, Small Pox (and other minor poxes) and the STDs. It wasn't until 1980 that Small Pox was said to have been eradicated, but I bet it still lurks somewhere. In Australia we had a program to eradicate tuberculosis. There are around 1200 to 1300 cases of tuberculosis each year, which means we are among the lowest-risk countries in the world. People who were born and grew up in Australia are very unlikely to get TB, unless they have close contact with a sick person. The low humidity and heat of our climate help kill off the TB germ in the environment. The people most at risk of TB in Australia are those who have spent their early years of life in countries with high rates of the disease. The arrival of immigrants from those countries is the reason we can't eradicate the disease here.
The Aboriginal pharmacopoeia didn't have preventatives against gunshot wounds, poison, grog or refined sugar and flour either.
 

facthunter

Well-Known Member
#86
They prized drinkable water as well and take branches from trees not the whole tree. It's a totally different value system.. I didn't particularly mention whiteys but the industrial revolution was of such magnitude and effect the period subsequent is notable for the rapidity of change of climate related factors..The population explosion has to be relevant too whether we face up to it or not,.It can't just continue, Nev
 

spacesailor

Well-Known Member
#87
" but the industrial revolution was of such magnitude and effect the period subsequent is notable for the rapidity of change of climate related factors..
The population explosion has to be relevant too whether we face up to it or not, It can't just continue, Nev"
That Date is being touted as the time our Diets changed & we started the big decline in our gut Microbes.
Now we have to find a cure similar to "Poor infusion" to replace those missing microbes.
spacesailor
 

Old Koreelah

Well-Known Member
#88
What a day. A bloke from my neck of the woods makes me ashamed and thousands of kids make me proud.
One banner at the school kids' strike said: "I'm missing a maths test for this!"
 

facthunter

Well-Known Member
#91
The silly LNP can't even realise these kids will be voting soon. Perhaps they will change that if they stay in power. ONLY business's (of the larger kind) owners can vote as they are the "Lifters". I'm sure that would appeal to many,. like smokin JOE Hockey. Nev
 

Marty_d

Well-Known Member
#93
Guess there's 2 possibilities why a culture would remain fairly stable for tens of thousands of years. Yes, one could be that they couldn't figure out ways to exploit the land more, another might be that they didn't change because they didn't want or need to.
Not being Aboriginal, or knowing any well enough to have this sort of conversation, I don't know which.
 

Old Koreelah

Well-Known Member
#94
Guess there's 2 possibilities why a culture would remain fairly stable for tens of thousands of years...
Perhaps the survivors of a global cataclysm brought on by human folly might choose to renounce technology and live simply, within the capacity of their local environment.
There is plenty of evidence of a supercivilization in the very distant past, before the Younger-Dryas event.
All over the world are inexplicable relics and massive stone monuments that even today we could not build. Most cultures build their cities close to the coast, but abrupt rises in sea level drowned most evidence for these civilizations. I've long held the belief that much will be discovered in the shallow waters off the coast of our continent.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Younger_Dryas_impact_hypotheses
 

facthunter

Well-Known Member
#95
Yes If you go to any ocean you will eventually get to the bottom of it, but you might have to think more deeply than usual.. Complex civilisations aren't resistant to changes. (like those in Egypt's past). WE are running out of water. (that you can drink). Nev
 

spacesailor

Well-Known Member
#97
O K
His / Their time line seems a long way out, as the big meteor strike in North America, was 40 to 6o, Million years ago.
They are talking of Prehistory at only Thousands of years ago.
If we could go back in time, What was the topography, PRE "Gondwanaland".
I suspect the Massive Meteor (that caused the Earth to liquefy) Didn't hit Earth but our twin planet, One third went out to space, One third fell on Earth (became Gondwanaland), And the final third Is the Moon.
Sounds good to me, & no history buffs to Prove it wrong,(Hopefully)
spacesailor
 

pmccarthy

Well-Known Member
#98
I believe there is agreement about an event 11600 years ago but they are not sure what it was. Caused the Younger Dryas just before Gobleki Tepi was built. It is all new information from research in the last decade or two.
 

nomadpete

Well-Known Member
#99
Space, its not a contradiction in time. The crater on Greenland is a different one from the one you are thinking of. There have been numerous relatively big meteor hits and the big ones seem to coincide with sudden dramatic climate changes, sea level changes, mass extinctions, etc.
The one in Greenland is estimated to have been about a kilometre across an hit a layer of ice that is hundreds of metres thick. Must have sent up an impressive cloud of steam!
 

Old Koreelah

Well-Known Member
O K
His / Their time line seems a long way out, as the big meteor strike in North America, was 40 to 6o, Million years ago.
They are talking of Prehistory at only Thousands of years ago...
As Nomadpete pointed out, our planet has been clobbered by lots of big chunks. One crater has been found in Greenland and it seems to be associated with sudden climate change and mass extinctions about 12,000 years ago. It might also have wiped out a highly advanced civilization.
 
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