Electric Cars - the discussion continues.

facthunter

Well-Known Member
True, but there are factors like what power your rooftop array is delivering, and what the off peak rate is. As a % it appears to be getting closer to the "Full" rate so the discount is not enough to make it a major consideration IF your own panels are more than the 3 some have. IF you are trying to heat water in an old "element" water heater your rooftop array won't go close to doing it unless you have about 20 and have a sunny day. The heat pump set-up is a different matter for water heating and is now cheaper than gas and a bit of a game changer I've found in the hot water department, whether off peak or not. Nev
 
Nev - take your point about people running out of fossil fuel as well.. However, my point was more that when I need to stop to fill the tank with petrol, the pumping bit takes - max - 5 minutes to "fill 'er up"... If I get a fast charging station, I need to wait at least 20 mins to get to 80% full... And I am reading it is often a bit more time.

Let's say, my diesel car claimed to get 180 miles to a tank (enough to get me from Somerset to London), but it only really got 120 miles to the tank (not quite enough). OK, I would have to pull over. Even with a comfort break, selecting a well-earned treat on account of the inconvenience and paying the bill, I would have stopped for a max of 10 minutes.. taking my 2hr 30 minute trip to 2 hrs 40 mins.. No big deal.

Now, I decide, hey that Nissan Leaf, with its 180 mile claimed range is perfect - will get me to my London base with between 20 and 40 miles to spare. Bear in mind, my driving habits would see it getting close to its max range, so I will allow, say a 40 mile difference and go the shorter way. But, to my horror, when I take delivery of the Nissan, it only really gets me 120 miles. OK.. So did my old diesel (in this hypo example). And there are plenty of stops on the way. But, now I have to stop for on average 30 minutes - albeit, while the car is charging, I can get my well-deserved treat, relieve myself and may was well buy a magazine for the wait. So, my 2.5 hour trip now, on average, 3 hours... And that is only to get the "tank" 80% full, which gives me even less range, next time around.. .in the case of the leaf, around 95 miles based on effective range.

Let's take that example further.. I want to drive from Syd-a-ney (remembering the call for the Olympic games) to Brisbane - some 900km or 560 miles.. I get 120 miles for the first fuel stop, and lets round it out to 100 miles for each stop afterwards (we aren't stopping for an overnighter on this trip). That is 5 stops (well, really 6, but I am allowing 40k short to be within the environs of Brissie). Adds a minimum of 2.5 hours to my drive for electric to less than an hour for fossil.

Having said that, our next car is going to be EV to replace the runabout, but I am keeping the diesel for the longer runs..

I think the future model of ownership is changing (well, in Europe, anyway); where individual ownership will be the minority and all of the above will probably no longer be applicable.
 

spacesailor

Well-Known Member
"People run out of fossil fuel too"
Most 4x4s have Longrange tanks. if not, like me will carry the extra fuel in cans, just to be certain of making that distance.
When driving from the Alice to Birdsville, I arrived with 1/2 a tank of fuel. But the pint in the pub went down too quickly & had to be topped-up a couple of times,LoL.
I see the reloes have started "car pooling" amongst themselves.mainly because of Rego & CTP.
spacesailor
 

red750

Well-Known Member
All this discussion of range etc. brings me to relate this little anecdote.

This weekend we travelled from home (Vermont) to Daylesford for a reunion of my wife's family. When we pulled out of our drive, the Distance to Empty gauge showed 155km. When we got onto the Eastern Freeway, the DTE started to increase, and continued to do so until we reached the outskirts of Bacchus Marsh, where it topped out at 226km. Once I started climbing the hills west of Bacchus Marsh, the gauge started dropping fairly rapidly. When we pulled into the motel in Daylesford, the DTE read 153. Taking DTE readings only, Daylesford is 2 km from Vermont. Just shows how much more efficient and economical an old Falcon is at highway speed.
 

kgwilson

Active Member
The current technology electric vehicles are great for short runs with plenty of time in between for recharging. Long distance means a long time when charging stops are included so they are not really practical for this sort of travel.

I know that Teslas use umpteen small cells and are part of the floor pan but I am wondering if with some collaboration amongst manufacturers coupled with improvements in battery technology that there could be slide in/slide out battery packs so when you need to recharge you just call in to the battery swap station, slide the flat one out & slide a fully charged one in & go. Say a 2-5 minute stop. If that was possible it would be a game changer.
 

facthunter

Well-Known Member
At the moment it's horses for courses. I've not suggested the electric for long distances at this stage of development. IF you run right out of fuel on a modern vehicle it won't just GO when you put more fuel in it. You don't go under a certain "safe" amount if you are wise. Nev
 

spacesailor

Well-Known Member
Back to MY long-range tanks !.
When I took the Pajero over to Fraser Ise, I did my W & B at the start of journey, all well and good, at Rainbow beach, I topped up the fuel tank AND filled the two jerry cans that are fitted to the Front of the camper-trailer.
Coming off the ferry on the island, the heavy trailer front pulled the rear of the Paj down and tore the rear bumper as it scooped up lots of sand
Had to tie one offending jerry-can to the rear of said trailer.
AND still had a marvelous time there.
WB, very important even without the airplane connection.
spacesailor
 

spacesailor

Well-Known Member
Even the dreaded diesel can restart, IF you bleed the injectors, before you crank the battery flat.
But if you can fly at 6 ltrs P hr, why worry, (
)
Not like RAA want ( HBdonkey.jpg
I don't know of any designer that likes you to adapt their plans to suit the owner, other than Hummel
spacesailor
 

spacesailor

Well-Known Member
I hope my HummeL Aviation Likes, are not classed as blatant advertising. I just like their designs, & the thought of Jabiru Aviation adjusting the wings to fit the
owner/pilot is, like all the other aviation company's, beyond their thinking.
spacesailor
 

spacesailor

Well-Known Member
Bruce
Jabiru as all aviation companies, (Jabiru was the only Aussie I could think of (no offense to a great company)), do not adjust their aircraft to suit the buyer
Hummel Aviation, according to what the kit buyer's are saying, the wings are relocated forward or rearward to compansate for Pilot weight (W&B.
On the HB the fuselage can be widend, lengthened and raised according to the needs of the builder.
And finally they are great looking planes to boot. Check out Dave kings Rotax powered HB.
Spacesailor
 

facthunter

Well-Known Member
Pilot weight, especially in a 2 seat tractor tandem is usually located within the C of G range. Engine swaps, adding starters and heavier props make much more change to C of G. Moving the battery is the most effective Cof G modifier. generally. Nev
 

spacesailor

Well-Known Member
Weight is the BIG enemy of ultralites.
When you can't move or add any weight, moving the main wings at the building stage is a Logical answer to that problem.
I haven't come across any aviation company that's tried that solution. (Hummel aviation excepted).
spacesailor
 

spacesailor

Well-Known Member
Well they've been trying for such a long time, well before Mr ford got his little four-pot car successful,!.
One day (unless something better comes along that pushes all that electrical work aside). Electric will rule the roads & sky's.
SILENT HARLIES !. HAVE TO CHECK MY HEARING-AID BATTERIES.
spacesailor
 
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