Electric Cars - the discussion continues.

Phil Perry

Well-Known Member
I recently 'Ferried' a Nissan E - something or other for friend who runs a small scale parcel / document delivery service, mainly for City use. He said that the battery was fully charged, and that I should be able to deliver the van to the demonstration event in Leicester, with no charging issues. Leics. isn't that far from his Base just up the road from me. After putting me on the company insurance, I had a safety briefing,. .

He is using four of these vehicles in central London ( No congestion charges, due to all electric ) but he has had some issues with drivers almost reversing over pedestrians, crossing the roads behind the vehicles, whilst the driver was trying to manouvre out of a street parking space and not hearing any engine noises. He asked me to be super vigilant in this regard ( As If I'd reverse ANY vehicle without looking first. . .)

As I drove off, I was Astonished at the Torque these vehicles have . . .they accelerate like a bloody high powered Motorbike. . . .but I can see how they could cause problems for pedestrians generally,. . .I had several lemmings walk off the pavement without looking first and giving me palpitations. . . . .

If you heve not driven an all Electric vehicle, and you get the chance, I can recommend the experience.. . .

Yes, it will be better when you can do more than 105 Miles per charge,. . .and when the country has massively upgraded its natinal power grid generation capacity. Utterly impossible at the moment in the UK without far more small Nuke stations dotted around.. . . until then,. .. small numbers of vehicles, nowhere near enough charging points. . and far far too little generation capabilty to keep them all on the road.. . .Maybe Hybrids will have to be acceptable for a few decades. . .
 

Cosmick

Active Member
I recently had the opportunity to drive a new Tesla (rich friend). I jumped in, checked mirrors and then had the urge to "start" the car, no just push the pedal. Friend had proximity key in pocket. Acceleration and De-acceleration were amazing.
 
When you consider the lack of interlinked mechanical components in an electric engined car v a mechanical engined car, there is little wonder the torque sensitivity is a lot higher.. I understand (at least one model) Tesla has 4 motors - one on each wheel - so direct drive electric - apparently the acceleration is painful..
 

Marty_d

Well-Known Member
When you consider the lack of interlinked mechanical components in an electric engined car v a mechanical engined car, there is little wonder the torque sensitivity is a lot higher.. I understand (at least one model) Tesla has 4 motors - one on each wheel - so direct drive electric - apparently the acceleration is painful..
How bloody sensible is that. No drivetrain loss- what's that usually, about 20%?
Not to mention all those hundreds of bits of metal in an IC engine trying to fly off in different directions all the time.
 

spacesailor

Well-Known Member
Allso a Steam car has maximum torque at throttle opening, Killed off by bureaucracy, Tax by weight.
Sounds like RAA, "wing load restrictions" for AUF 95-10 aircraft.
1930s Doble & Stanly steamers did 100 mph., mr ford,s did 40 mph down hill.
spacesailor
 

coljones

Well-Known Member
Allso a Steam car has maximum torque at throttle opening, Killed off by bureaucracy, Tax by weight.
Sounds like RAA, "wing load restrictions" for AUF 95-10 aircraft.
1930s Doble & Stanly steamers did 100 mph., mr ford,s did 40 mph down hill.
spacesailor
Weight is the thing that kills roads
 

facthunter

Well-Known Member
Steam is inefficient and there's no way to get around it. Latent heat of vaporisation of water is a fixed figure.. Steam has to warm up even Nuclear resembling boilers. aren't instant. Most steam cars weighed in heavy and needed a lot of water. They existed way before the 30's.. Nev
 

spacesailor

Well-Known Member
They didn,t think of using the same as train,s with it,s "coal & water tender", in the uk trailers are not registered like Australia so shouldn't have had to pay the Tax man, his ransom. LoL
spacesailor
 

red750

Well-Known Member
Maybe not electric, but self-drive.

Domino's is delivering pizza in the US in self-drive cars. Pizza in the back, car turns up, punch in the code given when ordering, and the door opens for you to grab your pizza. Yes, you have to walk to the kerb.
 

Bruce

Well-Known Member
How long was it to get a steam engine car going? I think a steam loco required a few hours, which would be unacceptable for a car I reckon.
Well at least you could run your steam car on wood from the farm. Did they use wood or coal or oil? Sorry but I've never seen a steam car.
 

facthunter

Well-Known Member
I have a friend with one that uses petrol for a very exotic surface boiler which I call the "nuclear reactor". It probably gets about a mile to the gallon. No gearbox and easily 120 MPH. Steam cars are like that. Oh your next question About 3 tonnes. Nev
 

spacesailor

Well-Known Member
Bruce,
checkout,
Jay Leno's garage.
Lots of interesting car's including a steamer.
The Doble was and is the ultimate collectors car, & is better than a RR.
stanley.jpg
spacesailor
 
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nomadpete

Well-Known Member
Nev, my current model Nissan Navara ute weighs 2.5 tons (unloaded). Our IC vehicles are getting nearly as heavy as a Stanley steamer!
As for start up time, I recall my father telling the story that he saw a neighbour who had a Stanley, to joke - he started up the Stanley, (don't ask, I don't know what that entails), walked away up the road, turned back and whistled up the car and it would quietly 'drive' itself up to him. I guess that it didn't take more than a couple of minutes to get up a head of steam. Perhaps new boiler technology combined with modern automation could make start up even quicker. Such as steam/ electric hybrid?
 
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