Electric Cars - the discussion continues.

Bruce

Well-Known Member
There will be a bottle of red prize for the first steam-powered Jabiru. I'll donate the prize myself and help drink it.
 

spacesailor

Well-Known Member
Steam can use many different fuels, the motor Can be made light. just need a different medium to our heavy water. maybe liquid nitrogen.
spacesailor
 

Bruce

Well-Known Member
The old Ghan , when it was steam, sure used a lot of water. It seemed to stop at every siding to fill up. Took 3 days and 2 nights to get to Alice Springs. Gosh, it was wonderful. 3 ft 6" gauge, moved with a slow swaying motion. Meals were silver-service. The dunny went straight out onto the track, and there was a notice saying not to use it whilst in a station.
 

facthunter

Well-Known Member
That was the "normal" train dunny. In the desert it would dry out quickly and not end up in the water supply.. Steam is very inefficient. You can have a closed system and condense the used steam but more weight involved. Saves onloading "good" water. Highly mineralized water wrecks boilers.. Nev
 

spacesailor

Well-Known Member
Yes
Steam trains were slow by today's standard.
Have you ever stood on a station and watched a high-speed express go past.
No quicker for the commuter!
Waiting for the slower train to take them home.
spacesailor
 

willedoo

Well-Known Member
The dunny went straight out onto the track, and there was a notice saying not to use it whilst in a station.
Many years ago, I was on a third class train in Java that had just a round hole in the floor in the toilet cubicle. When I went for a leak, I opened the door and the whole toilet floor space was covered with urine soaked chooks with their legs tied together. As a bloke, it wasn't too hard; you just had to nudge a few chooks away from the hole with your foot and complete the mission from a safe altitude. I felt sorry for the women on the train though. That couldn't have been good.
 

nomadpete

Well-Known Member
Reminder-
Thread title- Electric Cars!
We have drifted a long way onto good old C38 Steam engines of the past?

I suppose we are presently using Steam to power electric cars, so there is a connection.
And since we're here, is there some media other than water, that would improve the 'steam' process?
 

Bruce

Well-Known Member
Nomad, common sense is on your side, but common sense is wrong here. The efficiency of a steam engine depends on the difference between inlet and outlet temperatures of the "working fluid". The way to get higher efficiency is to increase this difference, which is why diesels have better efficiency than petrol engines.
So while you could use say ether as the working fluid and a solar hot water panel as a boiler, the efficiency would be very low. Bugger, huh.
 

Cosmick

Active Member
Traveled ‘Upper Class’ in Myanmar this year for ANZAC day. 9hrs south from Yangon to Mawlamyine and the car to Thanbyuzat to Commonwealth War Graves western end of Thai-Burma Railway. The amenities in the Train were clean. Typical squatter but due to the very bumpy ride has a stainless bronco handle at the front to keep deposits in their place.

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The food service was good although I drew the line at dried crickets and dried fish.
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Next year Sandakan Borneo.
 

nomadpete

Well-Known Member
Shame about that, Bruce. I always liked Steam. (I like electric too) because it gets away from the noise of constant explosions and vibration of the infernal combustion engine. But that's an emotional response. I'd really like to see a logical, efficient method of propolsion. So far, there doesn't seem to be any.
 

facthunter

Well-Known Member
The Persian flying carpet springs to mind, or the way your soul goes to heaven. Electric ,powered from solar is the MAGIC way to go. The sun's up there just waiting to help for free, and no one can make a monopoly of it. That's why they resist it's widespread use and we give COAL generated electricity to Aluminium smelters at prices kept secret. We could build many magic solar powered oasis's in the centre instead of sending people on a one way trip to Mars where you have no way of replacing a part for something you didn't anticipate would break. and bring with you at quadzillion bucks / Kg.. Nev
 

octave

Well-Known Member
Whilst in NZ recently I had the opportunity to drive an electric vehicle. It was an early Nissan Leaf and belonged to an employee of my son who kindly lent it to us.

20181014_120741.jpg

Interestingly the owner of this car is heavily into motorsport as is my son.

This car is an early Leaf and was a Japanese domestic import, I believe it was a little over 20k. The economics certainly stack up. Whilst we were there petrol was selling for about $2.40 a litre so I am thinking an equivalent petrol car would do about 7km per 100k, therefore, you would be looking at around $17 per 100km compared to around $3 enough charge to do 100km.

In terms of maintenance according to the service records it has not had any repairs other than new tyres. The brakes are original (from 2013) it has regen braking which greatly extends their life.

Approximately 80% of NZs electricity comes from renewables mainly hydro, geothermal and increasingly wind and solar.

My son is looking at getting a Tesla (he has more money than god). I suspect that within the next few years it will make economic sense here in Australia.
As this is an early model the range is not great although the new ones are much more impressive. Although this is an older EV it was a pleasure to drive.
 

Marty_d

Well-Known Member
Approximately 80% of NZs electricity comes from renewables mainly hydro, geothermal and increasingly wind and solar.
The Kiwis are certainly miles ahead of us. With a larger economy, land area and population we can't do things as smart as them. Makes me wonder if the politicians here are greater fools or just the population at large.
 

octave

Well-Known Member
The Kiwis are certainly miles ahead of us. With a larger economy, land area and population we can't do things as smart as them. Makes me wonder if the politicians here are greater fools or just the population at large.
My son moved his business to NZ 4 years ago and he loves it. Every time we visit he tries to convince us to move over there, which I must admit is an attractive idea. My son was recently collaborating with someone in Australia via Skype and he said he really enjoyed working this way except when was, as he put it "Turnbulled" (the Aussie end of the connection being slower and less reliable)
 
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