Information Get dripping with good health this summer!

old man emu

Well-Known Member
#1
In another example of "everything old is new again", beef dripping is making a comeback in fashionable foodie haunts. and its use is getting the nod from nutritionists.
Dripping is one of Britain's forgotten ingredients - now it's making a

If you are a Baby Boomer, can you remember your parents telling you to eat what was on your plate because when they were your age they only had bread and dripping sandwiches to eat?

And for our members in the Old Dart, when was the last time you had cod 'n' chips cooked in a vat of smoking dripping?

Out go the polyunsaturates, and we can cheer the return the return of truly natural foods. New research that suggests fat is an essential part of our diet and that we should be consuming it instead of refined carbohydrates and sugar. There’s evidence, for instance, that the omega-6 polyunsaturated fat found in margarines made from sunflower oil can lead to inflammation of the arteries and trigger heart disease.

So toss out that container of cooking oil and grab a block of dripping (250 gms @ $2.85) and make yourself a healthy fry-up of eggs, bacon, baked beans and tomatoes on fried bread.

But be careful! Don't mistakenly buy lard. That's made from pork, and we know you don't eat anything that is not halal.


Old Man Emu
 

facthunter

Well-Known Member
#2
There's nothing natural about eating overheated oils of any kind. Just because some margarines aren't the answer doesn't mean fried to a crisp bacon cured with nitrates isn't lethal food. High temperature cooking is great for (causing) cancer as is processed meat products. The popular sausage sizzle isn't necessarily healthy particularly if parts are heated to a charred condition, when it becomes a known carcinogen and who would want to know what goes into most sausages? Part cooking is the go for vegetables and "not overheated" olive oil..
You put good oil into your motor and $#1T food into yourself and wonder why you have a stroke/heart attack. I've heard plenty of times "if I have to give up cigarettes, junk food, sweet sugary drinks , Grog, I'd rather die." OK if that's your informed choice, you may get your wish. Nev
 

spacesailor

Well-Known Member
#3
No
I will give up all the bad things, and live a loong Miserable life devoid of the culinary pleasures, I know short lived people enjoy.
French woman (are we allowed to use that word these days) lived for 122 years, smoked until 100,drank red wine & had a hubby and children!.
If she hadn't been taken off the cancer stick how old could she have achieved.
I loved my bread & dripping.
spacesailor
 

Marty_d

Well-Known Member
#4
Yeah, it's a gamble. Some people are more prone to developing cancer from smoking than others. I know one bloke who lived to 95 despite being a heavy smoker all his life. I also know another one died at 74 from lung cancer. If you want to risk it, go for it - it's your life.
 

Yenn

Well-Known Member
#7
It is funny that since the experts have been telling us what we should eat, the health of the nation has been deteriorating.
Obesity if charted would match the increase in the consumption of polyunsaturated oils, sugar, canola and soy.
Just look at the people sat at fast food bars, see what they are eating and check out their size. Similarly look at them at the supermarket checkout. Do you see thin or even normal sized people walking out with cans of coke?
 

facthunter

Well-Known Member
#8
The advice is not being heeded by many, obviously Yenn. Junk food is cheap and the fat sugar and salt are addictive. 50 Years ago the number of fat people was small. Today diabetes is more prevalent, more so with non western people as they are more affected by the processed food. Very debilitating in some Pacific Islands. Nev
 

Yenn

Well-Known Member
#9
Yes Nev. But what can we do about it?
The same for the aboriginal problems. I would love to be able to do something to help, but the problem seems to be that they cannot help themselves.
Back to health I see endless TV programs where obesity is pushed as a disease. One recently a professor was telling obese people that is was their genetics that caused the obesity, then sending them to a psychologist for treatment.
Then again I should understand where professors excell. Just think back to Alan Fels, expert on everything and highly capable at incapability.
 

spacesailor

Well-Known Member
#10
QUICK FIX
Lets legislate ALL things bad for your health with a complete ban, starting NOW.
OOps, Did I say all things bad for your health.
But a lot are what i like, good food, swimming, driving my car, even camping in the bush as well as bush-walking are all dangerous.
But Aussies are conditioned to being "molly-coddled".
so goodbye recreational flying.
spacesailor
 

spacesailor

Well-Known Member
#11
But we don't have to do anything!
A group (led by the Obesity Policy Coalition and Global Obesity Centre,
Under the group’s recommendations, Wants a levy imposed by the Federal Government that would increase the price of sugary drinks by 20 per cent,
: with revenue directed toward a national obesity prevention strategy: and support of a healthy lifestyle.
(would that be themselves)
Don't give the $millions to that group put it towards the Medicine, power, and housing for pensioner's. ( who get $7.50 an hour equivalent) To lessen their load.
spacesailor
 

facthunter

Well-Known Member
#12
People who have destructive lifestyles should be free to kill themselves by eating, drinking, smoking,or whatever . That's fine in principle, except we all get to pay for the results, in the final outcome. Drugs cost millions where prevention would have seen far better outcomes. Diabetes is a seriously debilitating disease, (as an example) that affects native populations more than "western" types. Diabetes was virtually unknown in the Pacific Islands and many other places until WE introduced white man's processed (Junk) food and alcohol. Nev
 

Yenn

Well-Known Member
#13
I think the Pacific Islanders knew how to produce alcohol, before Westerners found them. The Australian Aborigine is reputed to have not discovered alcohol. Believable and also alcohol is destroying them. But as I said before, What can we do?
The concensus in Australia always seems to be that the government should legislate and indeed they have done plenty of that. They may even have achieved some good with the treatment of smoking. I cannot see that the government should be responsible for the bad habits of some of the population, who will not help themselves.
 

facthunter

Well-Known Member
#14
I can't see that anything is more important than your health. Kerry Packer had plenty of money and I'd
never be inclined to swap with him when even when he WAS alive. I know plenty who chase money. It governs everything they do. Many of them don't know happiness and if you only value something you can sell for profit you must miss many things of worth of another kind. Nev
 

spacesailor

Well-Known Member
#15
"The government should legislate and indeed they have done plenty of that. They may even have achieved some good with the treatment of smoking."
YEN
The Government Should legislate & outlaw tobacco completely.
Then, smokers Will get over the habit!,
Shut down the "safe" injecting rooms,stop All narcotics by Any force ( deport them to places like Indonesia ) and bring back the death penalty.
We will have a clean Australia
spacesailor
 

Marty_d

Well-Known Member
#16
"The government should legislate and indeed they have done plenty of that. They may even have achieved some good with the treatment of smoking."
YEN
The Government Should legislate & outlaw tobacco completely.
Then, smokers Will get over the habit!,
Shut down the "safe" injecting rooms,stop All narcotics by Any force ( deport them to places like Indonesia ) and bring back the death penalty.
We will have a clean Australia
spacesailor
Ever heard of the saying "those who ignore history are doomed to repeat it"?

The USA tried that with liquor in the 1920's. It lead to a flourishing black market involving organised crime.
Now the USA (since the Reagan era) has had its "war on drugs". This has lead to, er, a flourishing black market involving organised crime.
The USA has the death penalty. Saudi Arabia has the death penalty. Indonesia has the death penalty. Do you really think these places are "clean"?

I have the opposite view. Decriminalise every recreational drug. Plough the subsequent savings from your law enforcement, courts and prison systems back into treatment centres for addiction. This cuts out the black market and takes away the profits for organised crime. If you're going to say that a heroin addict buying his next hit is a criminal, then what about someone having a scotch? One is legal and one isn't, but they're both substances of addiction.
 

old man emu

Well-Known Member
#17
The problem with decriminalising possession of illegal substances in quantities said to be "personal use", is that each person who buys such an amount is supporting a much larger organisation. A single brick is rather insignificant, but a thousand bricks make a wall. Supermarket chains don't make huge profits by selling you a loaf of bread and a litre of milk today. They make their profit by your coming back on a regular basis to by your bread and milk.

Substances are banned, not because they are intrinsically evil (opiates for pain relief - good; for "recreation" - bad), but because of their effects on the user (physical and mental health) or because of their effects on the user in society (ice violence, inability to use equipment - cannabis and alcohol). Alcohol and tobacco are permitted substances, but their availability and use are moderated by many laws and financial penalties (excise tax):
Excise rates for alcohol

Here are the current penalties for drug supply in NSW: Drug Supply Charges in NSW - Sentences & Penalties
Perhaps we should demand that our penalties for possession or manufacture of commercial quantities of drugs have an immutable minimum penalty, so that persons convicted of such activities have to spend a minimum term of imprisonment, something like five years.
 

facthunter

Well-Known Member
#19
Putting people away costs heaps. Well over 100K per annum and rehabilitation and incarceration don't mix the way we do it here. How does more of what doesn't work, work?
Addiction... People profit from subjecting people to addictive things.. Poor people Gamble more than wealthier people (Not always though ) Most Pokies are located in the poorer suburbs. Alcohol interests constantly oppose restricting sales of grog to addicts in the NT for instance. Can't have profits affected can we? WE pay the highest prices in the world for drugs. That's why the world beats a path to our door., to sell them here. If you make them free ( with compulsory rehab for problem individuals) The market is destroyed. You CAN obtain this stuff cheap (Cut out the middleman) It's unhealthy and antisocial. A pastime for real losers if we can use that term. If it was less fashionable being a pothead wouldn't attract so many. Excess Grog is a BIG problem but the government and many others make a lot of money from it. Bad drunks are boring and dangerous. Once if you couldn't HOLD your grog you were ridiculed and told to give it up. Nev
 

nomadpete

Well-Known Member
#20
Totally agree that prohibition only generates a massive crime problem. I would only add that as well as rehab support for addicts (this is a mental health issue), and a strong propaganda programme, there should be strong penalties for drug driving (this includes drunks). Eg, confiscate and crush the vehicle the offender was driving.
After all, the main objective is to minimise the impact of drugs on the rest of us.
 
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