It's time to clarify units of measurement

spacesailor

Well-Known Member
#21
But
Even ln the metric system there's 12 yes
Twelve units. Six below and six above the base unit.
Yes I know Australia dosn.t use them
Just makes us out to be dumb.
spacesailer
 

spacesailor

Well-Known Member
#23
Counting a shopping list of 56 items is not moving the decimal point. Before metres
I had no problems counting in £.s.d
But now have to use a calculator for my
$ c shopping list.
spacesailer
 

facthunter

Well-Known Member
#24
Adding up is adding up whatever you use but surely you don't think it's easier in Pounds shillings and pence ? You're younger than me. Nev
 

Yenn

Well-Known Member
#25
Spacesailor may be younger, but I think he is saying that he is getting older.
I can remember multiplying and adding pounds, shillings and pence and it was never easy
When we went metric in 1966 I was doing the pays for the job I ran and got a load of info about how to handle workers queries when they got their first pay. Funny thing was I got no queries at all. It was so easy at the change over and way simpler for the paymaster.
 

spacesailor

Well-Known Member
#26
We will see if the car drivers will make the next metric change as easily.I. can imagine some drivers forgetting even weeks after the change to right hand driving. thinking it.s all a bad dream
I just add up shillings then remove the hundreds as each hundred makes five pounds. We all learnt th twelve times table. So no problems there.
spacesailor
 

spacesailor

Well-Known Member
#27
Why do they (you) say "imperial",
I don't say "republic" measurements, when referring to the French republic measurements (SI) "system de international Paris France".
The English system went away after the war, BA & Whitworth.
American (AF) or European (metric)
Lets start saying AMERICAN when not wanting a metric spanner.
spacesailor
 

old man emu

Well-Known Member
#28
AF is a means of measuring the size of the hexagonal heads of imperial sized bolts and nuts for the purpose of indicating the size spanner to use. It means "Across the Flats". The origin of the SAE standard comes from the English, or Imperial, system, which is based on inches and the fractions thereof. SAE, which stands for the Society of Automotive Engineers, was used as the standard primarily on U.S.-made cars and trucks through the 1970s. SAE sockets are sized in inches and fractions of inches, based on multiples, or the fractions, of 1/8th of an inch.

It is wrong to call for an "American" spanner or socket as AF is the term normally used.
 

spacesailor

Well-Known Member
#29
We only called, ALL the American surplus war tools, "yankee" as it was an American brand name, same as "hoover" vacuum cleaner's.
American fine thread as opposed to BA or Whitworth.
Made in America would not take :Imperial: Whitworth replacement nuts & bolts.
This is taken from Google.
"Metric measurements are gradually being forced on the UK,"
",so little manufacturing takes place in the UK now that most of what you buy is made abroad anyway."
It's one way to get the upper hand in the manufacturing world.
How long before the UK are FORCED to drive on the WRONG side of the road.
Then it will be our turn, to be FORCED into submission.
spacesailor
 

old man emu

Well-Known Member
#30
This table shows the relationship between the diameter of AN, MS and NAS bolt shafts and the AF spanner/socket that will fit the head of the bolt, or the nuts that go with them.
AF Spanner - Bolt Shaft Diameter.jpg
 

spacesailor

Well-Known Member
#31
Doesn't work in MY garage, as I routinely file ruined bolt-heads down to the next spanner size.
Works well & save's manufacturing more OLD sized bolts of any thread configuration.
Must admit I have never, until getting into Hummel Aviation, using a bolt call AN.
I still have my BA, Whitworth & gas, taps and dies, now of course forced to purchase the French Metric SI, ( lost my only German metric, DIN (equipment
to a lone out for a "mate" with a Merc, (Daimler-Benz)).
spacesailor
 

Bruce

Well-Known Member
#32
If we had 8 fingers and not ten, we might have invented computers sooner.
What about time? if a day is 24 hours exactly, then the second must be changing as years go by.
If the second is held constant, then 12 noon will drift and become earlier in the day as the planet slows its rotation.
 

octave

Well-Known Member
#33
If we had 8 fingers and not ten, we might have invented computers sooner.
What about time? if a day is 24 hours exactly, then the second must be changing as years go by.
If the second is held constant, then 12 noon will drift and become earlier in the day as the planet slows its rotation.
Also, variations due to the wobble of the earth on its axis hence the need for the occasional "leap second" Leap second - Wikipedia
 

Bruce

Well-Known Member
#35
My first computer was an 8 bit machine... 8 bits = 1 byte . A bit is a 1 or zero.
Thanks, I didn't know they had leap seconds and stuff, I only know that wind and tidal energy comes from the rotation of the earth and so the earth must be slowing down.
Maybe I should have known from engineering school, but all I remember that a solar day is different to a star day. You need that stuff like books of tables written by government astronomers to do surveying on a big scale if you don't have a GPS, and you also need a radio to get the time signals. All useless knowledge these days.
Sometimes I think Captain Cook would weep at the sight of a GPS, he was the only sea captain who could work out his longitude using lunar-star angles. That was before any time-signals.
And space, DIN stands for Deutch Industrie Normale , which is their standards lot.
 
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Old Koreelah

Well-Known Member
#36
Eight fingers?
I'm pretty sure Computer logic only needs two fingers.
Wait up! Make that 'only one finger'.

It's all just one's and zero's!
Yep. If you count on your fingers the decimal system will get you to ten
The digital system will get you to one thousand and twenty four.
 

spacesailor

Well-Known Member
#37
WHEN using the THUMB to count the segments of each finger, = 12, YES you count twelve on each hand.
Not taught in my English school !.
Enough of Bundesrepublik Deutschland . it's not taught at schools any more, Same with Esperanto,
I have a problem with AN as it's either 1/32 or it's 1/16 when measuring their bolts. I just get mixed up which fraction to use at the time I need it.
Where to get metric solid rivets from ?.
spaesailor


spacesailor
 

nomadpete

Well-Known Member
#38
It's a long time (in technoyears) since I had an eight bit computer.

Now I'd need 64 fingers to equate to my 64 bit computer. But I'm now confused. Do our 64 bit computers still process 8 bit bytes?

And my school didn't share that cunning method of counting to 12 on each hand. Imagine counting to twenty-four without taking my shoes off!
 

Bruce

Well-Known Member
#40
Everybody has their price, space. If we could get the same car $3000 cheaper if we changed to LHD, would you be tempted?
When in the US, I was too scared to drive myself because I thought that in an emergency, my instincts would be all wrong. A big cost of any change will be the accidents.
The buggy here at the farm is LHD, ( as is the Jabiru, as Marty points out.) The tractors and bikes are center-drive, and I doubt that they make the controls different for the RHD countries. But every time I drive an EU car, I continually operate the windscreen wiper instead of the indicators and I don't like these cars.
 
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