Plane Pics

Phil Perry

Well-Known Member
#1
Two fine old Aircraft. . . . . and one beautiful 'Might have been. . .'

CANBERRA LIGHTNING TSR2 1.jpg

An RAF pilot, that I used to deal with, used a term for older pilots - Wiffles; 'When I Flew Lightnings. . . .'.

A friend has a picture of all the TSR-2 airframes in a scrapyard,. . .he says it's too sad to post. . . ( working on it. . .)

Doncha just Lurve Pollies ? . . . .
 

spacesailor

Well-Known Member
#2
Are you!
Volunteering to chop those wings off, making them Truck ready.
I had that job when I was in my teens.
Not many people could say they used a "Gas-Axe" to cut up a ships copper boiler.
spacesailor
 

Phil Perry

Well-Known Member
#3
Are you!
Volunteering to chop those wings off, making them Truck ready.
I had that job when I was in my teens.
Not many people could say they used a "Gas-Axe" to cut up a ships copper boiler.
spacesailor

I regularly used a Gas Axe up n the high scaffolding whilst subbing as a welder for Costain in the centre of Melbourne, on a 14 floor office block ( second ever Aussie Job in 1972 ) we were responsible for cutting / fitting 150 x 150mm heavy angle steel to the concrete facing to take the next storey of brickwork. . .we 'Axed' the angle to length, drilled the concrete, but 'Blew' the holes for the loxons in the angle to save time. . .!

Damn useful tool. . . .
 

Phil Perry

Well-Known Member
#5
Only ONE 'Plane Pic' here, but an interesting historical link about an old RAF airfield I used to fly into and From, around twelve years back, I used to hire aircraft dirt cheap, from a guy who imported them from the States. . . 'By cheap' I'm talking £30.00 per hour Dry. . . C-150 / PA28 151 / Grumman AA5A / Auster 6. . . not bad rates for 2005 !

RAF Tilstock AKA Prees Heath ( Bomber training base 1942 )

Report - - RAF Tilstock, Shropshire, December 2016
 

Phil Perry

Well-Known Member
#6
Nuther nice Canberra pic. . .overflying ( EX ) RAF Kemble, Glucestershire. . . Nicely shows the 'Offset' position of the cockpit bubble. . .

Canberra over (EX) RAF Kemble.jpg
 

Marty_d

Well-Known Member
#7
Yeah it looks like they got the rest of the plane fairly straight... what happened with the cockpit? Was it just trying to reassure the Yanks that they're definitely left hand drive?
 

Phil Perry

Well-Known Member
#9
Yeah it looks like they got the rest of the plane fairly straight... what happened with the cockpit? Was it just trying to reassure the Yanks that they're definitely left hand drive?
It's bin a long time since I had a ride in one of these, 1964 at RAF Bassingbourn near Cambridge, when I was in the ATC air cadets. About six of us were given a 20 minute ride around, decided by lottery. . . we had to sit in the Navigator / systems / camera operator seat behind the cockpit. This was, from memory, completely enclosed, with a tiny little window on one side. In an emergency, the seat ejects Downward ! ! ! They DID explain why the cockpit was offset, but I can't remember. ( probably in wikipedia if anyone's that interested ! ) I remember it being terrifyingly claustrophobic though ! ( Yes,. . I 'Barfed' into the sick bag again )
 

Phil Perry

Well-Known Member
#10
Westland P.12 Wendover.

A prototype developed from the Westland Lysander, during the 1940 invasion scare, Westland tried to come up with a version of the aircraft which would be more capable in combat. The P.12 Wendover was the result. The front half was more of less identical to the Lysander. However the rear half was heavily modified. The rear portion of the glazed cockpit was deleted, and the fuselage was modified to feature a twin tail unit and with a tandem wing configuration. The conventional tail was removed and in its place a power-operated 4-gun Nash & Thompson turret was added.


 

Phil Perry

Well-Known Member
#15
Yeah it looks like they got the rest of the plane fairly straight... what happened with the cockpit? Was it just trying to reassure the Yanks that they're definitely left hand drive?
I read sometime ago that the USAF evaluated the Canberra in the early 1960s for it's high altitude Photo - Recon capability, but decided on the U2, as it could climb considerably higher, and was a little faster in the cruise. . .
 

pmccarthy

Well-Known Member
#16
I read sometime ago that the USAF evaluated the Canberra in the early 1960s for it's high altitude Photo - Recon capability, but decided on the U2, as it could climb considerably higher, and was a little faster in the cruise. . .
and had its cockpit in the right place.
 

spacesailor

Well-Known Member
#18
The cockpit is high because the engine is under the pilot, The engine is a thirsty one to haul big payloads, twin boom to let loader get in close to fill hopper, away from the prop, spoke to man in Transavia factory the year (or two) before it closed,( after being vandalized).
No spare parts just cannibalising the remaining aircraft.
spacesailor
 

Yenn

Well-Known Member
#20
I have read that the Lysander was a bit of a hancfull to fly unless you kept re trimming on take off. With the Wendover being so short coupled I would guess that it could be even worse.
 
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