The Great Theresa May. By FAR the Worst Prime Minister that the UK has Ever had.

facthunter

Well-Known Member
#43
Still in. Got one vote more than when she first was voted in by her party. This is an internal Party vote and no other can happen for 12 months according to their rules..Nev
 

facthunter

Well-Known Member
#47
Better times don't just come by waiting. IF they are so much more clever than Teresa why don't they help instead of bullying?. With mates like she has, she doesn't need enemies. The Tories are behaving like Tories, at their worst. Britain suffers while they fight each other..Those who started it walked away hoping to inherit the wreck.. No one has any idea where this will end up. Those who stirred it up didn't either. It's a good example of where knowing exactly what you are dealing with before you tackle it would be advisable.. The "unknown's of Scotland and Ireland were always present as factors of a major concern. Europe cant be too "nice" or others will follow UK out when they don't get their way with everything.. This is exactly what Putin wants, and HE hasn't fired a shot. (directly). Nev
 

spacesailor

Well-Known Member
#48
" This is exactly what Putin wants "
I didn't know He was in, (euro community)
I really thought he had so much More sense than to give away Russian rights and pay huge amount of money for the privilege
Poor UK taken to the cleaners, Duped into joining. & done over again trying to get out,
Whats will they loose next ! The Red cross from the "union-jack" first flown by the Scottish.
spacesailor
 

old man emu

Well-Known Member
#49
" Whats will they loose next ! The Red cross from the "union-jack" first flown by the Scottish. spacesailor
The components of the
The flag combines aspects of three older national flags:
The red cross of St George for the Kingdom of England - A red vertical cross on a white field,
The white saltire of St Andrew for Scotland - A white diagonal cross (X) on a blue field,
The red saltire of St Patrick to represent Ireland. - A red diagonal cross (X) on a white field.

According to legend, in 832 AD, Óengus II led an army of Picts and Scots into battle against the Angles, led by Æthelstan, near modern-day Athelstaneford, East Lothian. The legend states that he was heavily outnumbered and hence whilst engaged in prayer on the eve of battle, Óengus vowed that if granted victory he would appoint Saint Andrew as the Patron Saint of Scotland. On the morning of battle white clouds forming an X shape in the sky were said to have appeared. Óengus and his combined force, emboldened by this apparent divine intervention, took to the field and despite being inferior in numbers were victorious. Having interpreted the cloud phenomenon as representing the crux decussata upon which Saint Andrew was crucified, Óengus honoured his pre-battle pledge and duly appointed Saint Andrew as the Patron Saint of Scotland. The white saltire set against a celestial blue background is said to have been adopted as the design of the flag of Scotland on the basis of this legend

That leaves the Welsh flag off the Union flag. The Welsh flag is red dragon passant on a green and white field. The Welsh dragon does not appear on the flag because when the first Union Flag was created in 1606, Wales was already united with England from the 13th century. This meant that Wales was a Principality instead of a Kingdom and as such could not be included. In 1536, under Henry VIII, the Act of Union joined England and Wales officially.

The dragon could have its origin in the draco standards carried by Roman cavalry units stationed in Britain. The Draco originated with the Sarmatians, a unit of whom were stationed in Ribchester from the 2nd to 4th centuries. As the Roman draco bearer galloped into battle, air flowed through the open mouth of the standard and some device within the head created an eerie sound, much like blowing over the top of a bottle or jug.
1544767790123.png

The dragon became the symbol of many Welsh Leaders from the end of the Romano-British era to the beginning of the Tudor dynasty.
The green and white stripes of the flag were additions by the House of Tudor, the Welsh dynasty that held the English throne from 1485 to 1603 used by Henry VII at the Battle of Bosworth in 1485. His opponent, Richard III, the last king of the House of York, was killed in the battle. Historians consider Bosworth Field to mark the end of the Plantagenet dynasty, making it a defining moment of English and Welsh history.

The flags of England, Scotland and Ireland bear the crosses of saints. The Patron Saint of Wales is St David. His flag is a yellow cross on a black field.
 

willedoo

Well-Known Member
#50
Saint Andrew is also big in Russia. His cross is the flag of the Russian Navy.

" This is exactly what Putin wants "
I didn't know He was in, (euro community)
I really thought he had so much More sense than to give away Russian rights and pay huge amount of money for the privilege
Not sure what Nev meant by that. There's always a possibility that Putin thinks Russia would get a better deal on European trade without the regulation of the EU. He would probably be able to negotiate one on one deals a lot easier. Also when it comes to sanctions pressure, countries would be freer to make their own decisions on whether or not to trade with the Russian Federation.
 

spacesailor

Well-Known Member
#51
'The end of the Plantagenet dynasty"
I have been led to believe the Plantagenets live under the French on an Island, & are forbidden to ever set foot on English soil.
spacesailor
 

facthunter

Well-Known Member
#52
It's simple. Britain leaving, weakens the EU especially if they get an easy break which would encourage others to do the same The EU (and NATO ) pushing/ competing to get influence in Ukraine has angered Vlad (understandably). Crimea should have remain clearly with Russia but America was pushing there.. IF the EU breaks up you may well anticipate more Russian aggressive behavior like in Georgia to make Russia "Great again". Latvia, Lithuania and Estonia being likely future areas of unrest. Nev
 

willedoo

Well-Known Member
#54
Russia normally imports a lot of food from Europe in the way of fruit and vegetables and also packaged processed food. The Europeans lost a lot of fresh food exports to Russia due to being pressured to be part of the sanctions. They might not get back some of those markets as Russia has since sourced them from non sanctioning countries. On the other hand, Russia is a major exporter of wheat, barley and other grains.

I don't remember the exact figure, but Russia supplies about 30+% of Europe's gas energy needs. Most of the Russian oil and gas production depends on Western partnerships as, like us, they don't have the capital and expertise to go it alone.

Economically, Russia and the West are joined at the hip much like everyone else. There's lots of European investment and partnerships in Russia in food, technology and science, automotive and machinery, and in aerospace, almost anything you want to name really. If the Titanium Valley special economic zone turns out to be a success it will attract a lot more foreign investors with the low tax breaks and cost reduction means.

Boeing and Airbus are heavily partnered with Russia as a significant percentage of their aircraft's components are designed, engineered and built in Russia. The Boeing Dreamliner is about 14% Russian by weight. Apart from the obvious titanium components they supply treated aluminium components, undercarriages, hydraulic systems and flight control system components. If you land in an Airbus, it could very well be a substantial amount Russian origin gear beneath you.
How Boeing and Airbus use Russia's expertise to develop their airplanes

On the energy side, Europe is dependent on Russian piped natural gas via the Nord Stream pipeline in the Baltic sea from Russia to Germany, and the overland pipeline which transits through Ukraine. Plans are underway to build a duplicate Nord Stream 2 pipeline and the US has threatened third country sanctions on all the European companies partnered in the project. The US says it's all about national security and Europe shouldn't be dependent on Russian gas. The US solution is for Europe to buy shipped American LNG at up to twice the price. Unsurprisingly, the Germans have told Trump to p*ss off. The Europeans have also noted that the undersea pipelines provide more supply security than a flotilla of ships going back and forth across the Atlantic.

The Ukrainians get royalties for Russian gas transiting and are not happy about Nord Stream 2 as it makes their line less important and in future disputes between the two countries, Russia could shut off the line and Ukraine misses out on the big revenues it produces. Meanwhile, the Turkish Stream pipeline is full steam ahead in construction. The first stage pipes Russian gas under the Black Sea to supply Turkey. Future stages will go from there to supply NG to the southern sector of Europe. Turkey will make a lot of money in royalties and transit fees when that happens.
 
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willedoo

Well-Known Member
#56
Did England get any offer's for it's north-sea gas ?.
Or has Euro laid claim to some of it, (closer to Norway).
spacesailor
The UK has to import gas, rather than export. Britain's North Sea gas supplies almost half of the UK's requirements. The rest they import from Europe and Norway via pipelines and about 10% via LNG tankers. Norway is also one of the biggest suppliers to Europe, second only to Russia. So I guess they have the lion's share of the North Sea gas.
 
#59
I Just heard "39" BILLION POUND, to be paid to EU, just to say P O.
They'l have a great party on the poms, Who are NOT invited.
spacesailor
I haven't seen the figure but it would seem about the are that has been spoken about... And that, my friends, is why Britain is a bu f$&£ed at the moment.. there is little spine in British politics as the pollies are pretty talentless, lack courage and feel their votes are at the whim of social media. SO, they roll over. Legally, the bill isa currently around £14bn - £18bn, depending on the timing of when the exit happens and various short term commitments. However, the EU has been grabbing as much as they can, relying on the fact there are may current multi-year (5+) that were committed to when Britain was a member and they should pay for that. There is nothing in the treaties that require this, but for some reason, despite the way the EU (in some respect have to) treat Britain, Britain rolls over, presumably based on getting better terms than any other non-EU country, which the EU practicaly can't grant without beholding Britain to its laws and regs (otherwise it would undermine the whole EU).

Of course, there is domestic pressure to roll over by the big business and financial sectors for obvious reasons. Given both sectors back the Tories as well as wield general power, there are a lot of pollies who are using whatever mechanisms they have to dilute the meaning of the vote. The reality is the questions were stark and contained no ambiguity, so the words people didn't know what Brexit they were voting for; or that the weren't voting to be poorer are not necessarily reflective of the will of the slim majority of the voters who turned out. And it is not even clear that a second referendum would produce a different result - the polls are currently tilted in favour of Brexit by about the same margin as before (yes, younger voters may turn out this time).

Pollies also have to understand that people don't always vote with their hip pocket - that sometimes principle is far more precious.
 
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