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Jerry_Atrick

My Next Bike...

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Posted (edited)

While I do like the classic bikes, I was at my local Triumph dealer on Saturday trying to get the makle offspring interested...Well, there were plenty of Thruxtons, Scramblers, etc.. No Rockets, though - Which I do have a penchant for. Actually, my favourite is, or was, the Sprint (GT)... But, oh.. I was talked into a test ride of a Trophy.. OMG.. Best I have ridden. Good for a short posterior like me; oodles of power on tap and you can get the knee down... (I did take my kit just in case)...

 

Darn it.. Have to wait a year to save up!

Edited by Jerry_Atrick

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When I make the biennial visit to my mate in Darwin he arranges all his bikes out front as a welcoming committee. While there, I "own" his new 900 Thruxton, just the appearance of which gets my heart racing. It looks, rides and sounds like a traditional Triumph, but there is little vibration, the switches work and it doesn't mark its territory.

The only thing I miss is the kick starter.

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"The only thing I miss is the kick starter. "

You wouldent on a Vincent, if you got a kick-back it sends you over the handle-bars,

It hurts heaps.

Just like the Starting handle of old cars & stationary engines, kick-back & bandaged thumb for ages.

spacesailor

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Had a Speed Triple once. Lovely bike. Even now I can usually identify a Triumph by the sound alone.

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A 1971 Yamaha RT1 was the worst bike for kickback that I had. Kept me hobbling.

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...Just like the Starting handle of old cars & stationary engines, kick-back & bandaged thumb for ages.

spacesailor

Waddayamean "old cars"? My Lada Niva had a crank handle; like all kick starters or crank handles, properly prepared, it was easy to start.

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They all have heavy flywheels and that helps the change of direction to be less sudden. You PULL a crank handle, not push it straight armed. Don't kick a motorbike with your leg dead straight either. Nev

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Ah the fond and terrified moments from youth.

 

My first machine was when I was 13 and a light bugger at that.

 

Naturally I picked a easy to start and ride machine,......,........Not.

 

It was the first big enduro machine from Honda the XL350 Elsinore, lots of trick stuff for its time. And a absolutely obstinate bastard to start.

 

I had seen it break a guys shin bone. It was scary, fortunately my lack of weight helped in managing the backfires.

 

But boy when it ran, it ran very hard indeed.

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They usually tear your achilles tendon. Lots of those early two strokes started on full advance, (didn't have a system with wall effect )so keep the front part of your foot only on the K/S so it can slip off if a violent kick back happens. You can B^gger the rebound stop in the kicker case.

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Ah the fond and terrified moments from youth.

 

My first machine was when I was 13 and a light bugger at that.

 

Litespeed, my first bike was at the same age, a 175 BSA Bantam. Followed that up with a 250 Honda Dream, 500 Indian, 500 AJS, 750 Norton Commando Fastback, 500 Ariel, and a 50cc Suzuki step-through (that's not a typo; had a lot of fun on that little bike). After a gap of many years, the last bike was a 500 single Yamaha. Absolute mongrel of a thing to start; don't know if that's normal for them.

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Posted (edited)

Love those afterburners :cheezy grin:

 

Apart from a distinct similarity to a genre of another contient's bikes - they sort of look cool...

Edited by Guest

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Posted (edited)
And is it Russian ?.

spacesailor

 

I think it's a Suzuki. C90 Boulevard maybe.

 

 

 

This one's Russian. Electric motorcycle made by Kalashnikov. 3 metres long and weighs 510 kg.. Electric motor torque can push it from a standing start to 100 km/h in 3.5 seconds.

 

kalashnikov-izh-electric-motorcycle-vladimir-putin-cortez.thumb.jpg.27bce4b24c273d26bb2dabc0a5a51eb2.jpg

 

 

kalashnikov-izh-electric-motorcycle-vladimir-putin-cortez-main-image.thumb.jpg.cf7d3930841dfb88bb3c28a008893432.jpg

Edited by willedoo

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Tried to read the Tank badge, but too small, even using a magnifying glass.

In the late 50s to 60s there was a couple of big bikes ( UK) with full-fairings, from before the front wheel to the back of the rear wheel, just a knee hole to put your leg out.

Big cross-wind problem for them.

And a lot of fully enclosed scooters, some with 100 MPH top speed. (Nzeata)

spaccesailor

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Does it come complete with machine guns?

 

Probably an optional extra, no doubt. So far it's only been for police & security motorcades but Kalashnikov have been doing the sums on serial production for public sales. I doubt they'd sell enough to make it worthwhile, but who knows. They make a smaller electric bike in police and special forces variants as well.

 

 

kalashnikov-.thumb.jpg.ed2e6c0a813d5807193e71a1d6b09392.jpg

 

 

kalash.thumb.jpg.16d3f679ca3539945061b25cf4a76b79.jpg

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I love the MIL version - can see myself filtering through traffic - and the traffic seas parting to allow me to do it - in peak hour London traffice (which, ironically, is a treat to ride through as the drivers are - in the main - courteous to motorcycle (not moped) riders...

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Posted (edited)

This one stuck for a few days relates to the lead sleds back a few.

Mobile Lounges. Ok on smooth highways but you still have the rocks and gravel leaf mould and fumes from bus 's exhausts I'd probably ferry one to Sydney if you asked me nicely but I wouldn't want to own such machinery. You can't move it around to get it out of the drive or do a u turn on sloping wet grass. Nev

Edited by Guest

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One reason owners of those massive installations like to travel in groups: when it falls over you need a few mates.

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Posted (edited)

I've only has a few years without a bike from age 10 till now. You ARE generally considered a second class citizen , (who cares )but bikes stop to help when cars just keep going and the Bike thing is universal.. Tin top drivers just don't get the difference between riding and driving. You are so much more involved with the world out there, on a bike particularly in out of the way places.. I've got contacts all over the world. with bike people. If you are on a ferry to somewhere they come over after sailing and talk .Nev

Edited by Guest

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"You are so much more involved with the world out there,"

I thought so too, Until they passed the HeadGear law.

Enclosed head, JUST put a tin-top on.

spacesailor

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