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old man emu

Is the farmering work style a breeding ground for the Black Dog?

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The dairy industry problem is caused by the dairy companies having a monopoly. They buy from the farmers at the rate they set and sell to Coles and Woolies at the best price they can get.

When I started in farming we milked by hand, then later we used machines. I used to milk in the morning and a retailer used to pick up my milk, when he had run out of the previous evenings milk. He would be back after evening milking to pick up for next morning,

Later we milked and put it out on the stand for the dairy truck to collect, usually about 0830. It went to a big dairy, massive machines for sterilisation of thousands of bottles. The dairy company now has a lot of money tied up so screws the farmer down, demands that the farmer puts his milk into big cooled vats and gets picked up weekly. Also wants to have bigger farmers, so less of them. Now the farmer has money tied up in breeding the next generation of milkers, Milking machinery and shedding and is in no condition to withhold supply and demand a fair price for his product.

I got out of dairying in 1961 and at that time we were getting 3shillings and sixpence per gallon . That is 35 cents nearly 70years ago. What should milk cost now if we took into effect the inflation rate.

No wonder farmers suffer and it is not only dairymen.

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Yenn you're alone; a huge number of Australians grew up on small farms. The valley I grew up in (my pen-name) was a thriving community of dairy farms until the late 1960s, when we lost the British market because they joined the EEC. Competition from margarine was the other main factor that drove loads of us off the land. My home valley is now almost deserted.

 

It always amazed me that people will winge and complain about paying a few bob more for good healthy tucker, but will happily pay lots more for imported crap that buggers your health.

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IF I'm short of time and wandering around town I just get a couple of pieces of good fresh fruit and a few nuts. . Nev

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I thought it was famous for Doctors of high standing. It's a long while since I lived in Sydney. Things may have changed. Nev

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In the long run, there is room for optimism. Prices for farm outputs are rising. They are still too low, but improving...yae!

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The name for a farmer in France is a peasant. Or Paysant from the Pays (country). Traditional all through history they have been screwed and robbed of their hard earned crop worth. by landowners and barons, merchants and thieves .. I must admit you have to actually do it for real with your whole assetts (and borrowings) tied up with it to realise what the situation is "on the ground " so to speak. Most think the stuff turns up on the shelves by some form of magic and is always too expensive no matter what. More than 1/2 is rejected because it's too big, too small or has a mark on it where it rubbed against another branch. or the market is flooded in a "good" year. Nev

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More than 1/2 is rejected because it's too big, too small or has a mark on it where it rubbed against another branch. Nev

 

In the apple industry, Woolies and Coles are calling the tune on the variety of apples they will buy.

From the NSW Dept of Primary Industries: Apple varieties do change over time as new ones become popular and older varieties either are no longer in demand or become unprofitable to produce. However, there is still room for some older, less popular varieties that have reduced demand, but these can no longer be produced for large markets such as supermarkets — they can be grown for roadside stalls and for discerning consumers.

 

Since it take about seven years for a newly planted orchard to produce a profitable crop, trendy foodies setting the taste requirements are killing the local market. The trendy foodies think, "So what if local orchards can't produce what I want here and now. We'll import our fruit from the Third World."

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"More than 1/2 is rejected because it's too big, too small or has a mark on it "

Double yolk eggs are also rejected.

spacesailor

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Terrible for food with a few insect marks to be rejected.. A few marks like these are proof that the stuff is safe from too many chemicals.

Well nev and space will not make the blunder of thinking unmarked stuff is safer.

I have actually heard of market farmers who have a row for their own family consumption...guess what? no chemicals and a few insect marks.

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But people don't want extra Protein in their fruit (maggots & lavie)

spacesailor

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The big whinge of $1 for milk, Now they put it up to $1.10, then it's suddenly $1.38. when will we get back to stable milk pricing.

spacesailor

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10 hours ago, spacesailor said:

The big whinge of $1 for milk, Now they put it up to $1.10, then it's suddenly $1.38. when will we get back to stable milk pricing.

spacesailor

The horse has already bolted

  • Haha 1

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And we import powered milk & make "Long Life " thats still $1.00 litre.

Don't seem to help our farmer's at all !.

spacesailor

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 If the microbes won't eat it neither should you, regardless of the price. People pay more for bottled water than they will pay for milk.  Buy just on price and expect quality and value? Do you still believe in the tooth Fairy? . Nev

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Prices are rising for agricultural produce, helped by the banks foreclosing on farming families, so that multinationals can then buy their land. When enough land is in the hands of big corporations, look out, prices will soar. profits will be sent overseas and who will be the losers?

Ethiopia used to be a nation of peasant farmers. Big corporations paid them more money than they had ever dreamt of, so they sold and had to move to town. No income so the cash didn't last long. The corporations grew flowers for the European market, result less food, prices rise and the ex peasant farmers can't afford to live. Result was years of famines and food aid.

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They say capitalism is competition and that drives down the prices. In reality the small companies get swallowed up and often just closed down producing a monopoly where they can charge what they wish to and tailor it to an export market that doesn't even provide any for the locals Take LNG as an example and often the best produce is sold to the overseas market at below local prices just to get exposure and penetrate the bigger market. Example Australian Wines.  I've seen the invoices, personally.  The last people they care about is the locals Example Nigeria and oil.  Nev

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