Jump to content
  • Welcome to Whats Up Austraila!

    Intuitive, Social, Engaging...Registration is FREE.
    Register Log in
Phil Perry

Electric Cars - the discussion continues.

Recommended Posts

I assume your Stealership is in China. How would it go in Australia? Is there any incentive in China to go electric, because I don't think there is any from the aussie government.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Marty_d said:

What's the nominal service cost and interval?

It's bullshit is what it is. Over 200,000 kms in 4 cars and not one has ever been into a workshop once, EVER.

 

Apparently BMW and Nissan to name 2, have 15,000km services, to service what exactly? Just a lie.

 

The Tesla has had a set of wiper blades, fitted them myself, and I pump up the tyres sometimes. Oh and I fill up the washer bottle myself, I'm awesome I tell yas!

 

Although EVs are initially more expensive, there are no service charges, tyre and brake wear are greatly increased due to linear acceleration, and regen braking. the Tesla weghs 2200kgs, but the first set of tyres went 75,000kms, and brakes look fine. in fact I barely ever touch the brakes in any EV as the regen does 80% of the braking for you.

 

I feel sorry for the current Dealerships around the world, not sure what they are going to do as a large chunk of their income comes through service and spare parts.

 

Because no service costs, better brake and tyre wear etc, lowered cost of fuel, the cost of an EV draws equal to an ICE after 5 to 8 years.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Yenn said:

I assume your Stealership is in China. How would it go in Australia? Is there any incentive in China to go electric, because I don't think there is any from the aussie government.

Great incentives in China, the Government pays a quarter of your car, further tax incentitives to businesses, free parking in cities for 2 hours, Government run or Gov sponsored charger installations, besides cheap electricity because essential services (water, gas, electricity) belong to the people here, as they should everywhere (yeah right).

 

Australia wouldn't be difficult because you don't need the large premises for servicing, it's just a sales outlet, you could even do it from a Shopping Center, just deliver the cars to people's doors. Warranty issues could be covered by Ultratune or other selected service outlets. A small out of town cheap premises for holding and distributing spare parts.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My wife just said "Maybe we should go and live in China"

I wonder what the louts in Hong Kong would say to that. For all the bad press that China gets I haven't heard one word about the amazing restraint shown by the Hong Kong police force. I wonder how the Qld government would have handled riots like those in Hong Kong.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I suspect the praiseworthy restraint of the HK police is due largely to blanket coverage of the events by foreign media. Elsewhere in China, standing up against the government might not be as safe; local journalists and dissidents get "disappeared" on a regular basis.

In the far west, hidden from prying foreign eyes, perhaps a million people have been locked up in re-education camps, while physical aspects of their centuries-old culture are bulldozed. 

Despite stringent security, stories of unspeakable atrocities are leaking out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

they obviously have a lot to learn from Indonesia. They have West Papua tucked up nicely and no other nation wants to know about it.

  • Sad 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/11/2019 at 2:44 PM, Old Koreelah said:

In the far west, hidden from prying foreign eyes, perhaps a million people have been locked up in re-education camps, while physical aspects of their centuries-old culture are bulldozed. 

Despite stringent security, stories of unspeakable atrocities are leaking out.

....What the???

 

On another thread you asked me not to speak of this!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Marty I suggested we not involve our mate in China in these discussions. 

That's not a good place for a foreigner to be challenging government excess.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Given the UK wants to be a leader in getting to "net zero" carbon emissions (whatever that really means), they have pulled the subsidy for EVs...

 

Though, I know more and more people who drive EVs and they love them.. .they are darned fast, as well..

 

I drive 170 miles at least two times a week.. I don't want to be faffing about for 1/2 hour at servos. for these drives, but apparently there is a next gen charging system and batteries coming in that make charging a bit faster  - and if I can get a 250m+ range, I will go for one (Why 250m+? Because you can be stuck in traffic for a darned long time in the UK).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Jerry_Atrick said:

and if I can get a 250m+ range, I will go for one (Why 250m+? Because you can be stuck in traffic for a darned long time in the UK).

My son owns a BMWI3 and has just purchased a Tesla 3P (which I am looking forward to driving in a few weeks - he lives in NZ) On our last trip he loaned us the I3 to get around which is delightful to drive. On one occasion there had been and accident so traffic was bumper to bumper and stop start all the time. There is no better car than an EV in this situation, all the other vehicles constantly idling and burning fuel meanwhile when we were at a standstill with virtually no power draw.  

 

I think his new Tesla will charge to %50 in 20 minutes at a super charger and its stated  range is 310 miles, this model was not cheap though.  The BMWI3 has a range extending motor which is really just a BMW motor bike engine which can be set to kick in and will hold the charge at its current level. 

 

One thing that acts as a disincentive to purchasing an EV is the up front purchase price (at this time) although they are cheaper over their life people (including me) are not good at doing a whole life comparison. We avoid up front cost even if the eventual cost is better.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tesla's latest creation, the Cybertruck is reputed to have 250,000 pre-orders. It is reported to have a retractable tonneau cover which is a solar panel, for recharging while parked.

 

tesla-cybertruck.thumb.jpg.dd0617fbb9e5a34dab2dcda3c2c43f5c.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, red750 said:

Tesla's latest creation, the Cybertruck is reputed to have 250,000 pre-orders. It is reported to have a retractable tonneau cover which is a solar panel, for recharging while parked.

 

tesla-cybertruck.thumb.jpg.dd0617fbb9e5a34dab2dcda3c2c43f5c.jpg

And a prime example of what happens when Homer Simpson does the styling.

 

I'm much more impressed with the Rivian (pics below).  Although at the moment the projected price point of over $100,000 for the SUV puts it beyond our means.

 

rivian suv.jpg

rivian ute.webp

Edited by Marty_d

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Marty_d said:

And a prime example of what happens when Homer Simpson does the styling.

 

I'm much more impressed with the Rivian (pics below).  Although at the moment the projected price point of over $100,000 for the SUV puts it beyond our means.

 

rivian suv.jpg

rivian ute.webpUnavailable

 

When I first saw the cyber truck I thought WTF but it is growing on me.  Most new  designs that are not incremental tweeks of older designs are usually jarring at first.  I imagine if you dropped a 2019 car into the 50s people would be horrified, they would want to know why there was no chrome and why so curvy etc.

 

Most talk in the popular media has been quite superficial and there seems to by little consideration over why that shape was chosen. ie cost and aerodynamics.  Here is a video where these things are discussed. 

Tesla Cybertruck Design Genius or Design Fail? Exploring the Function behind the Design

 

I guess it is down to personal taste but many things we find fashionable now were initially thought to be ugly.  I wouldn't buy one myself  or any other pick up truck because I have no need but if I did I think I would looking for price and function first, lets face what truck is good looking.

 

Edited by octave

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, octave said:

When I first saw the cyber truck I thought WTF but it is growing on me.  Most new  designs that are not incremental tweeks of older designs are usually jarring at first.  I imagine if you dropped a 2019 car into the 50s people would be horrified, they would want to know why there was no chrome and why so curvy etc.

 I think it looks great.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you think the Cybertruck looks weird, what about this rendering?

 

tesla-truck.thumb.jpg.0fbe3a71b164e6447a44c6dce1321068.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe I'm just old fashioned.

 

Funny thing is, I love the looks of the Land Rover Defender (110) - even though I'd never own one.  It also has a lot of flat panels, plus all the windows, but just enough rounding of the edges.

 

I can understand what the guy says about ease of manufacture and yes the drag coefficient would be low, but fer chrissakes it wouldn't break the bank to round off the edges.

What is the real worry, and which was not addressed in that video, is the safety of the vehicle.  All very well being able to hit it with a sledge hammer, but what about crumple zones?  I'd be very interested to see testing of this and what ANCAP rating it'd achieve.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, Marty_d said:

What is the real worry, and which was not addressed in that video, is the safety of the vehicle.  All very well being able to hit it with a sledge hammer, but what about crumple zones?  I'd be very interested to see testing of this and what ANCAP rating it'd achieve.

 

I imagine that the presented version will evolve somewhat into the production model. It will of course have to pass crash tests etc and conform to regs.  I do find it more interesting and exciting the more I see it. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If it's ever sold in Australia it would have to have a different body than the prototype. They're claiming it's bulletproof to 9mm. rounds and the glass is armoured to a certain degree. There's no way the public will ever be allowed to buy an armoured car in this country.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, willedoo said:

If it's ever sold in Australia it would have to have a different body than the prototype. They're claiming it's bulletproof to 9mm. rounds and the glass is armoured...

America's obsession with guns has gone far enough.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe it's invisible to police radar - looks like it is modelled on the F117.

 

10 hours ago, willedoo said:

the glass is armoured to a certain degree

In the release presentation, Musk had a chap throw a ball or rock at the front door window - it smashed. So he threw one at the window behind the door - it smashed also. Elon Musk suddenly lost $274 mil.

 

Cybertruck broken windows needs explaining.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very hard to fix dents in flat panels. And sharp folds have a high reject rate during forming.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...